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Sunday, December 13, 2009

Thanks to Walmart, the December 12, 2009, Wreath Day at the Fayetteville National Cemetery was wonderful, but daring to park in wetland where VA plans to expand cemetery was a bad choice for several people who attended the ceremony

Please click on still images to ENLARGE view of photos and click start arrow to view video and watch for spot to click to view full screen size.

Wreath Day mistake sinks tires in new wetland part of cemetery

Aubrey james | MySpace Video


The wetland (critical groundwater recharge area over a bedrock fault in Fayetteville's geological structure) shows why it is essential that the Washington County Livestock Auction (sale-barn land) become a part of the Fayetteville National Cemetery instead. Walmart's providing the trucks, equipment and volunteer employees to make wreath day possible shows that the corporation cares. Maybe Walmart could lead a coalition of corporate donors to buy the sale-barn property and donate it to the National Cemetery (Department of Veterans Affairs).

Please click on images to ENLARGE view of Walmart trucks in the Fayetteville National Cemetery for Wreath Day, December 12, 2009.



 


When a wrecker gets stuck, you know it wasn't a good place

Aubrey james | MySpace Video







This strip of land recently studied by the VA and its contractors is to be prepared for use by the cemetery. Obviously, it will have to be covered with several feet of additional soil so that graves will be above the flood level and will eliminate a significant part of the "critical groundwater recharge area" of the Town Branch of the West Fork of the White River. Water that historically would have soaked in there will be forced to find new routes, and the amount of water forced to stay on the wooded wetland at right will be increased. Water running off that area already is piped to the Town Branch at the 11th Street bridge. The volume of water flowing south of that bridge toward 15th Street will be further increased and flash floods will be more dangerous to lives and property downstream.

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